We have identified over 650 questions and answers concerning many of the topics featured on this site. The information is categorised and can be reached by navigating via the entries below.

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What would independence mean for education in Scotland?

Education is already almost fully devolved to Scotland. Our system is performing well. Scottish pupils outperform the OECD average in reading and science, and are similar to it in maths, and the latest results show that we have halted a period of relative international decline since 2000. These improvements, achieved under devolution, show that when decisions are made in Scotland better results are achieved for Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will independence mean for schools?

The management of the school system in Scotland is already fully devolved.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What educational rights would people expect in an independent Scotland?

This Government believes that Scotland’s permanent written constitution should include the right to education and the right for every young person to be offered a job or training.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will independence mean for denominational schools?

The present system will continue. Faith-based education makes an important and valued contribution to Scottish society and the right of parents to make that choice for their children will remain.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will independence mean for skills and training in Scotland?

Independence offers Scotland an opportunity fully to mobilise its resources to build a skilled workforce ready to meet demand. At the moment, the financial benefits of successful employment initiatives by the Scottish Government – such as Modern Apprenticeships, higher and further education funding and other training programmes – go to Westminster in the form of reduced welfare payments and increased taxation. With independence we will be able to retain these benefits in Scotland and will be able to re-invest them in our people.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will independence mean for Gaelic?

Gaelic has been a continuing element in Scottish heritage, identity and history for many centuries. Gaelic has official recognition and it is an increasingly visible part of Scottish public life reaching into education, the arts, media and broadcasting. In an independent Scotland, Gaelic will have a central place in Scottish public life.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What would the priorities be for Gaelic in an independent Scotland?

Our aim as a government would be to continue to reverse the decline of Gaelic in Scotland. The most recent Census has demonstrated that initiatives in support of Gaelic have significantly slowed down the decline of the language. Policy and resources would continue to be directed to the priority of increasing the numbers speaking, learning and using the language.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will Gaelic be recognised as an official language in an independent Scotland?

In Scotland, Gaelic has a significant level of official support from the Scottish Government. Official recognition for Gaelic is also provided by the 2005 Gaelic Act. In an independent Scotland this official recognition would be confirmed and maintained.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will there be more support for the Scots Language in an independent Scotland?

The 2011 Census, for the first time, provided information on the numbers of Scots speakers. This information, in an independent Scotland, will assist in developing policy and promoting the use and status of the Scots language and supporting communities that speak Scots.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.