We have identified over 650 questions and answers concerning many of the topics featured on this site. The information is categorised and can be reached by navigating via the entries below.

Information can also be retrieved using the Search box. This will search through the entire list of FAQ entries (in the Title and the Body) and will return results based on a match based on the words you input. If you wish, you may enter complete questions, e.g. "What currency would we use in an independent Scotland".


Deprecated: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in /home/customer/www/yeswecan.scot/public_html/libraries/fsj_core/third/smarty/sysplugins/smarty_internal_compilebase.php on line 88

Will an independent Scotland maintain current levels of support for renewable energy?

The current Scottish Government’s policy is that it should. Spare generating capacity throughout the UK is now at its lowest level for a generation and Ofgem forecasts it will contract even further. Without Scottish renewable energy supplies, there would already be a shortage in capacity.

Retention of the single GB-wide energy market will bring benefits of energy security to customers and businesses both north and south of the border. While detailed discussions between all parties will be necessary, we believe that it is in the interests of all that the central aspects of support for low carbon generation, as established and planned under Electricity Market Reform, should remain.

An integrated and single energy market involves customers throughout GB paying on an equitable basis for a wide range of benefits, including stable prices, security of supply and access to renewable generation. Scottish renewable production is among the most cost-effective in the UK and offers clear advantages to the rest of the UK in meeting its EU obligations, as is reflected by National Grid’s decision to invest to upgrade transmission connections between Scotland and England.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will the transmission charging regime be in an independent Scotland?

Through the Scottish regulator, an independent Scotland would seek improvements to the transmission charging methodology. The Scottish Government has long argued for an approach to transmission charging which delivers a level playing field for Scottish renewable and thermal generators, and which supports development in areas of the highest renewables resource and on Scotland’s islands. In addition to enhancing Scotland’s security of supply, a fairer charging regime will support the growth of renewable generation, recognising that such capacity needs to be developed where the resource is located.

In an independent Scotland, this Government will seek to ensure that future charging regimes take our energy resources and security fully into account in a way which meets the needs of our island regions and connections.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

The Energy Bill is currently making its way through the UK Parliament. Will an independent Scotland continue with this regime?

The current Scottish Government proposes that Scotland should continue to participate in an integrated market for electricity, under the terms of the Energy Bill – provided that Scottish security of supply is safeguarded.

However, as a substantial supplier to the rest of the UK, an independent Scotland will require a far greater degree of oversight of the market arrangements. Hence, the specifics of a continued GB-wide market will require detailed discussion between all parties. Through the planned Energy Partnership with Westminster, this Scottish Government will ensure that Scottish interests are protected.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

How will independence impact on Scotland’s targets for decarbonised electricity generation in Scotland?

These targets will remain in place on independence, and independence will give Scotland the full range of powers to develop renewable energy.

The current Scottish Government has set a target for the equivalent of 100 per cent of electricity demand to be met by renewables by 2020, and a 2030 electricity decarbonisation target to achieve a carbon intensity of 50g CO2/kWh of electricity generation in Scotland.

Good progress is being made towards this, with renewable generation in Scotland hitting a record high of 36.3 per cent of gross consumption in 2011, well above our 31 per cent interim target for that year. Provisional figures for 2012 show a further increase to almost 39 per cent of gross consumption. Our 2030 electricity decarbonisation target could actually be hit a little earlier, perhaps closer to 2027.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

How will the EU’s renewable energy targets be apportioned when Scotland becomes an independent member state?

It will be for the EU to determine how the targets are split, but Scotland has a target of delivering the equivalent of 100 per cent of electricity demand and 11 per cent of non-electrical heat demand from renewables by 2020 – significantly more ambitious than the EU target.

The current Scottish Government has also committed to working with Westminster to ensure that the rest of the UK also meets its target obligations at the least cost. That will involve deploying Scottish renewable energy into the GB grid. Indeed the EU Renewable Energy Directive highlights the value of ‘co-operation mechanisms’ between member states.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) operate in an independent Scotland?

The current Scottish Government intends to continue operating the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) following independence. The RHI was introduced by Westminster in 2011 to incentivise the use of heat produced from renewable non-fossil fuel sources, such as wood fuel or heat pumps.

The RHI is key to an independent Scotland meeting the Scottish target of 11 per cent of heat demand from renewables by 2020, and will play a significant role in decarbonising the heat sector by 2050, with significant progress being made by 2030. The Scottish Government has developed a range of supporting actions to increase deployment of renewable heat technologies in Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will the Green Deal continue in an independent Scotland?

The current Scottish Government proposes that schemes that are in place immediately before independence, such as this, will be inherited by an independent Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.